If you know anything about basketball, you know the signature icy stare and unmatched passion for women's basketball from none other than Pat Summitt, the legendary University of Tennessee women's basketball coach. The Pat Summitt Foundation announced this morning that she died peacefully in her sleep, today in Tennessee, at 64-years-old.

Ms. Summitt suffered from early onset dementia, Alzheimer's type which prompted The Pat Summitt Foundation to Find a Cure for Alzheimer's.

According to ABC News, her son, Tyler Summitt, said in a statement, "She died peacefully this morning at Sherrill Hill Senior Living in Knoxville surrounded by those who loved her most. She’ll be remembered as the all-time winningest D-1 basketball coach in NCAA history, but she was more than a coach to so many – she was a hero and a mentor, especially to me, her family, her friends, her Tennessee Lady Volunteer staff and the 161 Lady Vol student-athletes she coached during her 38-year tenure."

The obituary on the Pat Summitt Foundation website, read, "A private service and burial for family and friends will be held in Middle Tennessee. A public service to celebrate her life will take place at Thompson-Boling Arena, on the campus of the University of Tennessee-Knoxville. Details for the celebration of life will be shared at a later date."

It went on to say, "On Tuesday, June 28 2016, Pat passed away peacefully, following a courageous battle with early onset dementia, “Alzheimer’s Type." This disease attacked a lifetime of precious memories, memories that she has now won back as she rests in her eternal home. Memories that will live on in each and every relationship she developed throughout her life."

"This is one simple statement that Patricia Sue Head Summitt embodied, lived by and passed on to so many throughout her 64 years of life. She ‘won’ every day of her life because of the relationships she developed, nurtured and cherished. Relationships with her family and friends. Relationships with players, coaches, and fans. And most importantly, a strong relationship with her Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ."

Summit was the recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom and the Arthur Ashe Courage Award at the ESPY Awards in 2012 when she stepped down as Tennessee's coach - only a year after her diagnosis.