Have you noticed that the amount of mosquitoes is much worse this year? Well, we know why.

I don't know about you, but I always have a BAD mosquito problem in my yard. I can't even walk outside for two minutes without having to swat those pests away. It's a nuisance that nobody wants to deal with. Maybe you have tried citronella candles while sitting on your patio. That helps some. Perhaps you have lemongrass or peppermint plants in your yard to help keep the mosquitoes away. Somehow it seems that they are all only so effective. Nobody in my family has been able to go outside without getting eaten up this summer. If you feel like mosquitoes have been much worse in Indiana this year, it isn't your imagination.

globalmoments
globalmoments
loading...

Mosquito season for us here in Indiana kicks off in April and runs through September. That's when the temperature and conditions will be just right for these pests. Over time,  mosquito season in Indiana has increased quite a bit.  Mosquitoes are thriving in our area for up to 21 days longer this year. That means that Hoosiers will be seeing more mosquitoes for longer periods.

WOMI-AM logo
Get our free mobile app

Why is Mosquito Season Worse This Year in Indiana?

The answer to that question is simple. Climate change is responsible for the more extreme mosquito season. According to Northrop Grumman, summers are getting longer by four days every decade. So that means we will experience eight more days of summer weather in 2024 than we did in 2004. According to Terminix:

<p>Mosquitoes thrive under certain conditions, and these help dictate the when mosquitoes are active and non-active. Typically, mosquitoes become active at temperatures above 50 degrees Fahrenheit. However, they require temperatures above 70 degrees Fahrenheit to truly thrive.</p><p>Additionally, mosquitoes prefer moist, humid environments. These are prime breeding conditions, and warm areas with heavy rainfall may see increased mosquito populations and activity.</p>
Getty Images
Getty Images
loading...

How Bad Are Mosquitoes in Indiana?

I recently found some maps created by SSP Innovations that show areas of high humidity, wetlands, average rain, and heat at night.  When those maps are layered together, they perfectly reflect the areas of bad mosquito areas. The darker the shade of pink, the more prevalent mosquitoes are in the area.

SSPInnovations.com
loading...

This map shows that the southern states are much worse for mosquitoes, but if we zoom in on Indiana, you'll notice that some areas of the state are just as bad as a state like Florida.

SSPInnovations.com
SSPInnovations.com
loading...

As you can see, southern Indiana (around the Evansville area) sees the most mosquitoes. This makes sense because Evansville was named the hottest city in the state. Also, a little patch up north by Fort Wayne also has an abundance of mosquitoes too. You can learn more about these maps and how bad mosquitoes are in your area by clicking here.

If you find that you have a bad mosquito problem, there are a few things that you can do to keep them away. Did you know that the color of the clothes you are wearing can attract mosquitoes while others tend to have a more repelling effect? It's true. You can learn more about that by clicking here. We also have a couple of hacks that you can try to keep mosquitoes away. These include a DIY mosquito trap idea that you can try out, changing your body soap could keep mosquitoes away, as well as a DIY beer mosquito repellant.

Plants That Deter Mosquitoes and Other Bugs

Ways to Avoid the Bite of Mosquitoes

It doesn't matter what time of year it is, Louisiana can experience a rapid change in weather in just a matter of twenty-four hours. With warming temperatures, it seems like we constantly have to deal with mosquitoes.

Look, whether it's getting rid of standing water or wearing insect repellent, there are several things you can do to get rid of mosquitoes.

Gallery Credit: Bernadette Lee

8 Reasons Why Mosquitoes Love You More Than Other People

Gallery Credit: Jude Walker

More From WOMI-AM