Let me take you back to a nice summer afternoon in the mid-70s and Ben Hawes State Park.

We'd loaded up the station wagon for a big old picnic out by the rocket slide.

You remember the rocket slide, don't you?

Anyway, we'd gotten everything put out on the picnic tables and were ready to dig in. About that time, my grandmother got up and started making her way to the car. Just before she got there, we saw why she made the move.

Two skunks were at the top of the nearby hill, close to the beginning of the walking path. My grandmother--we called her "T," sort for Topmiller--just said "SKUNK" just before she climbed in the car.

We gathered as much as we could and joined her. And then we left, because those skunks didn't appear to be going anywhere. We finished the picnic at home. Fortunately, none of us had been sprayed.

But during skunk mating season--which is happening now in Kentucky--getting sprayed is hardly outside the realm of possibilities.

They are moving about and are more likely to walk out in front of your vehicle this time of year.

And you know what happens if you hit one. Lord a'mighty.

Fortunately, the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture's Cooperative Extension Service has the information we need in the event a skunk gets us.

They provide a list of commercial deodorants that are made to nullify skunk scent like neutroleum alpha (never heard of it), Skunk Off, Skunk Stuff, Nil' Odor (this one I've seen), and Ecosorb.

Forewarned is forearmed, so make sure you know what to do in the event you get sprayed by skunk.

OR, you could do like my Uncle Nick did a very long time ago before I was born...make a couple of them pets and have them de-scented.

Of course, that was a long time ago and I don't know if you can even have them as pets anymore.

But what a conversation piece, right?