A nasty bug deemed as the "deadly kissing bug" has made its way to 28 known states in the US and one of those is Kentucky!  Here is what you need to know to protect you and your family-->

The bug measures about an inch long and feeds nightly on the blood from the lips and faces of humans while they are asleep.

Most would think that the bite is what makes the bug such a deadly threat.  What makes the bite so dangerous is the the bug has a habit of doing its' business on the bite after the fact.

According to Syracuse.com some kissing bugs are infected with the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, which can be transmitted in the fecal material, and cause the potentially deadly Chagas disease.

Chagas disease can cause a number of ailments including vomiting, body aches, and fever.  Several folks who have contracted the disease also noted having chronic conditions such as chest pains, difficulty breathing, and even death.

To take it one step further our four-legged furry friends can also be affected by the bug.  The disease does not transmit from person to person.

To date there are 300,000 known cases of Chagas in the US alone.

The CDC also recommends these precautions, which could limit exposure to humans and pets from kissing bugs in the United States:

*Locate outdoor lights away from the home, dog kennels, chicken coops, and turn them off when not in use.
*Remove trash, wood and rock piles from around the home.
*Clear out any bird and animal nests around the home.
*Seal cracks and gaps around windows, air conditioners, wall, roofs, doors and crawl spaces.
*Tightly seal chimney flues when not in use.
*Utilize screens that are on doors and windows.
*Keep pets indoors at night and keep outdoor pet areas clean.
*Consider having a licensed pest control professional inspect your home.
*Do not squish or touch a suspected triatomine bug.
*Instead, place it in a container and fill it with rubbing alcohol or freeze it before taking it to the health department.

The bug has also been found in Indiana and Tennesse.