Missouri has a bunch of fantastic cities like Columbia, Branson, Jefferson City, St. Louis, and Kansas City, but which one is the "coolest'? One Website claims they know the answer to that question, and I don't know if they got it right...

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According to the website thediscoverer.com, Kansas City is the coolest city in the Show-Me State of Missouri. The site ranked the coolest cities in each state, Chicago won in Illinois, Iowa City won for Iowa, Boston won in Massachusetts, and of course, New Orleans won in Louisiana, if you want to see the complete list of winners for yourself just click here! So what made the site choose Kansas City over deserving cities like St. Louis, and Columbia? On the site they said...

"...the Kansas City food scene is nothing short of legendary. Taste for yourself with brisket at Arthur Bryant’s BBQ or burnt ends at Fiorella’s Jack Stack... the Historic Jazz District which doubles as the most entertaining section in town. Come to 18th and Vine to eat, listen to live music, and soak in the atmosphere."

They go on to mention there are some can't miss things in Kansas City like the American Jazz Museum which is a tribute to all things jazz. I will say that Kansas City isn't the wrong choice but I don't know if it is the right choice either, ya know? Missouri is tough because it has a bunch of cool cities, I would argue one of the coolest things you can do in Missouri is going to a Cardinals baseball game in St. Louis and St. Louis has Budweiser with the brewery tours, so what is your choice for the coolest city in Missouri?

LOOK: See how much gasoline cost the year you started driving

To find out more about how has the price of gas changed throughout the years, Stacker ran the numbers on the cost of a gallon of gasoline for each of the last 84 years. Using data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (released in April 2020), we analyzed the average price for a gallon of unleaded regular gasoline from 1976 to 2020 along with the Consumer Price Index (CPI) for unleaded regular gasoline from 1937 to 1976, including the absolute and inflation-adjusted prices for each year.

Read on to explore the cost of gas over time and rediscover just how much a gallon was when you first started driving.