Needless to say, none of us will ever forget how our lives were upended due to the COVID-19 pandemic. In fact, it might end up being the biggest story of our lifetimes.

I believe that not because of the scope of the virus, itself, but because of all the changes that had to be made and how they will affect our lives in the short and long term.

For example, Zoom became a huge part of our lives, and then, suddenly, the realization took hold that many in the workforce could do their jobs from home--if they want to. That could be in the category of "long-term effect."

In the short term, take a look at college athletics. The NCAA is allowing seniors who, otherwise, would have exhausted their eligibility at this point to return for another year if they'd like, since the pandemic wreaked havoc on many a schedule and shortened the season. As a fan, that will make for some extraordinary basketball IF the right players take advantage of the opportunity. Truthfully, most will move on. But some have already opted to return.

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I was reminded of college hoops when I learned of the passage of Senate Bill 128 into law.

I have talked a lot with friends who have school-age kids about the move to remote learning and for most of them, it hasn't exactly been a picnic. It's an unusual format in which to thrust students who aren't as accustomed to making big adjustments on the fly.

There was obviously enough of a consensus about the method that it reached the governor's office. Hence, the new law which will allow students a supplemental school year. In fact, it's called The Supplemental School Year Program.

But it isn't exactly about just going back to school for another full year. That's pretty much laid out in Section 2:

Notwithstanding any passing grades a public school student may receive during the 2020-2021 school year, any student enrolled in a Kentucky public school in grades kindergarten through 12 during the 2020-2021 school year may request to use the 2021-2022 school year as a supplemental school year to retake or supplement 8the courses or grades the student has already taken. A retaken high school course under this subsection shall not count as an additional credit towards graduation unless the student failed the original course. Retaking a course under this section shall count towards full-time enrollment for the student.

Education.ky.gov breaks down the finer points of the new law and how it affects graduated students, gifted and talented programs, and alternative programs, among others.

Students will have until May 1st to decide if The Supplemental School Year Program is for them.

Old Daviess County and Owensboro Schools and What They're Up To Now

[SOURCE: Tristatehomepage.com]